Leave Tendulkar Alone!!!!


The tirade against Tendulkar has reached new idiocy levels. It is one thing to expect volatile, immature, irrational followers of Indian cricket to make ludicrous charges against the great man, it it totally another for the so-called reporters of the game to write irresponsibly. The article by Siddharth Monga in cricinfo is a case in point. It seems that Sachin is in a damned if I do, damned if I don’t situation with these charlatans. He fails, and they are after his blood, he scores and they seek more blood, he scores slowly and he is compared with Ponting and on and on. Tendulkar should probably approach these buffoons on a daily basis and ask for a “to-do list” and perform like an assembly line cricketer. Mohan has repeatedly mentioned on this blog as to how Tendulkar of today is not the same one we may have seen even two years back, he has changed, he has become more human and he struggles like everybody else. But is there anyone, anywhere in the horizon of Indian cricket today who can do any better. For goodness sake, he has scored two centuries pretty much back to back and has put India in positions of winning on both occasions. As I have mentioned earlier, the ball is literally in the bowlers’ half, they did not perform in Chittagong, hopefully they will deliver here in Mirpur. What if he attempted to score quickly after Dravid got out and triggered a collapse? India have managed to reach a score which practically closes the door on them having to bat again, they have provided more than enough time for the bowlers to get even a more reputable side out twice. And Tendulkar has played a very crucial role in bringing India to this position. Give it a break guys, leave the fella alone, he has delivered in the past albeit differently, he continues to deliver in a more humanistic way. Why does he alone have to always prove himself to ridiculous levels of detail (thank god they have left his personal life alone, else, given a chance, they will start questioning his way of raising kids as well I suppose!!). He is a champion, will continue to be one, and will always remain the greatest player to have graced our generation for me….

– Srikanth

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22 responses to “Leave Tendulkar Alone!!!!

  1. Srikanth Mangalam

    Not that I have to defend Tendulkar or, even worse, that he has to defend himself, here are some points to consider during India’s innings:

    1. Dravid’s innings was beautifully split between day 1 and day 2, and as a result, he did not have handle the heat for an extended period. Jaffer and Karthik retired ill and were therefore in a position to resume their innings. Tendulkar did not have that luxury, he stayed on till 1 hour after tea after having played for over an hour the previous day. And you could see this having an effect on him especially during the session between lunch and tea, the time during which he has been accused for committing a crime and not playing for the team, leave alone the fact that India had also two wickets…

    2. When Sakib started bowling 2 ft outside leg stump and, which, even Dhoni was not able to deal with, Sachin changed his stance, played square on and actually attempted (and succeeded twice) to score boundaries.

    3. Apart from maybe a couple of overs, he was still ensuring that India was scoring at about 4 an over.

  2. I have the same thoughts guys! Notice how they damned Tendulkar for taking 4 balls more for his second fifty in that article!

    So if SRT had scored at 60% SR would that have created a lot of runs for India – taking into account that he played 240 balls, that accounts for 24 runs? Cricinfo plays with percentages to show how bad his scoring rate was, without ever considering what the reasons might have been. And then to add to that they claim that SRT accelerated after tea only because he might have had instructions.

    To me the idea was very clear, play long once so that BD has no chance in hell of avoiding follow-on. India had to have one person who was to stay as the anchor and SRT was the guy who was playing the role. Any score less than 550 would have given a glimmer of hope for BD to avoid the follow-on and with a 5 bowler line-up we just had to make sure somebody had to stay.

    Prabu

  3. Interesting adjectives for the other point of view “volatile, immature, irrational, charlatans” .

    I thought the article was very analytical – please read this passage.

    There is more to it than the numbers, though – and that’s the worrying part. A show of intent was missed probably as much as the ability to take control of the game and demoralise the bowlers. It has become a cliché to say how painful it is to see Tendulkar scratch around for runs against bowlers who are good but not exceptional but, on today’s evidence, it still stands true.

    Mashrafe Mortaza kept coming at him with manful short-pitched stuff, because he saw Tendulkar was not comfortable handling it. Even yesterday, he had played at and narrowly escaped tickling the first delivery with the new ball. At times, he ducked too early; on occasions, he took his eye off the ball while swaying away. During the opening spell of the day, he kept Mortaza especially interested. Hook shots weren’t even contemplated, it seemed. He scored 19 off 52 Mortaza deliveries. It could have been any other batsman.

    Mohammad Rafique was not given any opportunity to disbelieve that Tendulkar has history against left-arm spinners. Twice, after Tendulkar had passed fifty, Rafique did him with classical stuff, not the stifling kind. At 52, he edged one past the non-existent slip for four. The next one Tendulkar, well set, did not have a clue about. He was 72 when one pitched on the middle stump and took his outside edge. Rafique was not even required to adopt the defensive approach of bowling over the wicket.

  4. At the risk of inflicting boredom (for I have said it once already) let me repeat my view on this:

    I think it is us, Team-India fans, that have to get ourselves (and our expectations) adjusted to the new-Tendulkar. He appears to have done so — and quite well too, I might add…

    This is the Tendulkar I think we are going to see from now on for a while. Perhaps phase-4 of his career. He has perhaps had both the time as well as the courage and ability to introspect, look hard in a mirror and come up with a set of new challenges, approaches and goals.

    Of course, this is all conjecture at the moment, but one can see the beginings of a trend. He dropped to #4 in the ODI batting. He has eschewed the crash-bang-swat-thump shots. He concentrates more on timing and running hard. These are all useful pointers.

    If that is the case, more power to him and his tribe.

  5. I think the difference between the Tendulkar of old and new is –

    1. He doesn’t have the reflexes that he once had
    2. 17+ years of cricket have taken a toll on his body (Shoulder, elbow injury to name just a couple)
    3. To compensate for 1 and 2, he has cut down some shots from his repertoire. I remember that in his early days, he said in an interview that he had 3 to 4 shots for the same delivery. Not anymore.
    4. Further to that, he has also cut down on low percentage, high risk shots – like the hook in test cricket
    5. His role in the team has changed. Perhaps as a result of 1, 2, 3 and 4. Or may be his role has partially contributed to 3 and 4.

    So, what has this done to his game? His scoring rate has dropped to around 3 an over…which is still not that bad for test cricket. It is fair to say that these days the scrutiny of a Tendulkar innings is higher and as Srikanth pointed out, the tolerance level much lower.

    The problem is that we’ve so gotten used to Tendulkar dominating the bowling attack that nothing else will do. I wonder if Mohd. Kaif had played in Tendulkar’s place and played a similar innings, whether the criticism would have been this high.

    So, bottom line. Is Tendulkar still good enough to play for India?. Hell! Yeah…

    But that doesn’t mean Indian fans don’t have the right to whinge about it from time to time 🙂

  6. In my view, the Indian cricket fan, it would seem to me, swings from “let us build a temple for him” to “let us stone him to death”. There are examples of such behaviour all over the place — and even on comments in this blogsite! I don’t see that changing in my lifetime! Sigh.

    Tendulkar should just play his game. After playing the game for 17 years, I am sure he knows a thing or two.

  7. But I’m amazed why so many people have turned against him! Why has Sachin lost the right to be human? There in SA he played aggressive innings twice or thrice but couldn’t reach a century–he was criticised for that. Here his innings have not been aggressive but he scored centuries; again he is criticised!

    What the hell do they expect from him????

  8. Apart from the last test match, Tendulkar did play quite well in SA. He was timing the ball well and some of his shots were pure vintage Sachin. But at the end of the day, his strike rate was probably still around the 50 mark.

    Reflecting on the way the batsmen played in the series, it makes me wonder if the batsmen were probably told to treat the test series as a glorified net session as long as they won the series…

  9. There are other Tendulkar fans too.

    I remember his delectable back foot cover drive (not the kind of Sehwag like cut shot) of Wasim Akram. Back foot cover drive is a rare shot.

    As someone points out, Sachin with all his injuries, is not going to the same player, he was 10 years back. ViV Richards was batting at No.5 towards the end.

    Whether aggressive scoring or not, a great batsman is in total command over the bowling and does not seem tentative or giving any chance to the bowler. Boycott or Sunil Gavaskar were very defensive oriented batsmen.

    That is where I see Tendulkar is not now. That is perplexing and is also mentioned in the article.

    There is more to it than the numbers, though – and that’s the worrying part.. It has become a cliché to say how painful it is to see Tendulkar scratch around for runs against bowlers who are good but not exceptional but, on today’s evidence, it still stands true.

  10. A friend once told me, “Having seen Tendulkar play the way it did, it is painful to see him play the way he is right now. So, I think Sachin should retire.” I may have misquoted him slightly, but the intention and context of the quote have been retained. We have seen many such quotes on this blogsite too. My response to this friend was, “If pain persists, see a doctor. If it still doesn’t go away, a psychiatrist may be able to help.”

    The bottom line is that Sachin is perhaps in a new avatar. We need to recognise that and solve our problems the way we can. He is playing in a team and for the team. The team decides whether his current role is needed or not.

    As for myself, apart from that one dig in South Africa, I haven’t seen anything unduly wrong from the man. Yeah! There have been the odd disappointments now and then that have merely served to reinforce the view that I always maintained that he is only human!

    So, I endorse the main thrust of this thread: “Leave him alone” but would add, “If pain persists, see a doctor.” 🙂

  11. Love the way to put your points across, Mohan!:)

    And I completely agree with you.

  12. nationsunderthesun

    To the Author of this blog —

    Absolutely wonderful retort to an insipid article by Siddharth Monga. I agree with you that the criticism of Tendulkar has reached farcical heights. Out of interest, did you post your thoughts on this matter on Mr.Monga’s cricinfo blog? I had near identical feelings on this matter and posted very similar comments on his blog — but it was obviously too much for Mr.Monga to stomach.

  13. Monga’s blog? Can you give me its URL?

  14. Chandan, (are you by any chance chandan from the channel4 cricket forum?) Monga contributes to cricinfo blogs which is where I came across the Tendulkar article :

    http://blogs.cricinfo.com/cricinfoselect/archives/2007/05/whither_tendulkar.php

  15. Yes I am. Didn’t know I became so well known at C4 though!:)

    Thanks for giving me the blog URL.

  16. Srikanth Mangalam

    NUTS (not in a derogatory sense!),

    I did not but did notice several comments to Monga’s blog which made similar references. How did Monga react?

  17. Hasn’t reacted as yet!

  18. And he didn’t publish my comment because it had some harsh remarks about his article!

  19. http://ind.cricinfo.com/db/ARCHIVE/2005-06/AUS_IN_BDESH/SCORECARDS/AUS_BDESH_T1_09-13APR2006.html

    RT Ponting: 50 off 116 balls, 151 mins (5×4)
    RT Ponting: 100 off 235 balls, 357 mins (10×4)

    This match was being played from 9th to 13th April which would hardly have the extreme conditions we had towards the end of May.

  20. http://content-ind.cricinfo.com/bdeshvind/engine/current/match/282692.html

    SR Tendulkar: 50 off 98 balls (2 x 4, 1 x 6)
    SR Tendulkar: 100 off 200 balls, 294 mins (6 x 4, 1 x 6)

    This was 26th May when we had most intense heat and humidity.

    Cricinfo articles?

    Peerless Ponting too good for Bangladesh: http://content-ind.cricinfo.com/bdeshvaus/content/current/story/244235.html

    Whither Tendulkar? As mentioned in this blog-post.

    Can I ask why has there been this bias in cricinfo?

  21. http://content-ind.cricinfo.com/bdeshvind/engine/current/match/282692.html

    SR Tendulkar: 50 off 98 balls (2 x 4, 1 x 6)
    SR Tendulkar: 100 off 200 balls, 294 mins (6 x 4, 1 x 6)

    This was 26th May when we had most intense heat and humidity.

    Cricinfo articles?

  22. Peerless Ponting too good for Bangladesh: http://content-ind.cricinfo.com/bdeshvaus/content/current/story/244235.html

    Whither Tendulkar? As mentioned in this blog-post.

    Can I ask why has there been this bias in cricinfo?

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