England Vs India: Test 2 Day 3 — England claw back…


On an intriguing day of Test cricket, England had their first good session of the ongoing Test match between England and India at Trent Bridge.

However, things did not go Englands’ way to start off. India had a solid first session on day-3 and did exactly what the doctor ordered — to see off the new ball and keep the scoreboard ticking. Ganguly looked assured and played with hunger. He was often seen egging his more illustrious partner on whenever Tendulkar played and missed to Sidebottom. The fire and hunger seemed to back in Ganguly. So also the swagger. He had even hooked Tremlett for a huge six over squre leg! And what’s more, to rub salt into the bowlers’ wounds, he made Tremlett wait at the top of his bowling mark as he turned sideways to admire the shot on the grounds’ TV screen! He was doing a Ganguly as only Ganguly can! This was a session that was India’s all the way. The forecast would have been ominous for England at lunch time. The scoreboard read 338/3. India had made 82 runs in 28 overs, had seen off the new ball and were playing Panesar with aplomb. Tendulkar was on 87 and Ganguly was on 53. Tendulkar was looking good for a century and even though Ganguly was 47 runs away from a three-figure mark, it seemed almost inevitable that he’d cross the three-figure mark too — he was playing as well as I have seen him play in a long time.

The first session of day-3 was clearly Indias’. Our session-by-session score card would have read 5-0 to India after 6 sessions of the match had been played.

At lunch time, England would have been looking for inspiration from somewhere. Maybe even an extra pair of legs! Maybe a fresh body? And that they did find. Suddenly, in the post-lunch session, it appeared as if England were playing with 12 players!

They clawed their way back into the match and even recruited an Australian to help them along in their journey. Tendulkar and Ganguly were sent packing by the Antipodean and England managed to get Dhoni out with their normal complement of players. Session 2 of day-3 had belonged to England.

Simon Taufel had a bad day at the office and unfortunately, the next time one of our Indian media pundits (or couch potato fans) adjust their spectacles, settle themselves comfortably into their chair/couch, dig the record book to say “it has been X innings since Ganguly/Tendulkar scored a century“, or “the last time Tendulkar/Ganguly scored a century was against a minnow“, the fact that the two players were robbed of certain centuries will have been forgotten. The record books merely state “SR Tendulkar lbw b Collingwood 91” and “SC Ganguly c Prior b Anderson 79“. And that is all there is to it. And that is all the scoreboard can say. You accept the good with the bad and move on. As Ganguly said phlegmatically, in his post-match, “You have to live with it“.

Just as Cook was not out, but given out in Englands’ first innings, the Indian team has to live with these two shockers from the normally good Antipodean.

And we should not really be making a big deal out of these screw-ups. We have to accept the good with the bad and move on. That’s exactly what Tendulkar did, and after a brief mind-fuse, Ganguly seemed to have accepted it too.

However, the worrying thing for Taufel would be his form. He has made some good decisions in this series so far. Of that there is no doubt. But he did send (if I am not mistaken) Dravid and Pietersen packing in the first Test. His handling of Cook, Tendulkar and Ganguly in this current Test could be the onset of a pattern. Just as players need to look at their form and their match preparedness, perhaps it is time for Taufel to stand back to take stock?

Jonathan Agnew, in his BBC blog, says that these two decisions ultimately “did not affect India’s position unduly“. Firstly, it is irrelevant whether or not it did. Secondly, I think it could well affect India’s position. Time will tell. However, I predict — perhaps foolishly — that there may well be a few more twists left in this match! More of that later.

England used their luck as a platform to claw their way into the match. Some will even say that they created their slice of luck — and that would be fair enough in my books! They stuck to their task manfully. Apart from Anderson who had suddenly started to look like the Anderson of old, all the other bowlers stuck to their task. Sidebottom and Panesar were particularly impressive. Their fielding never waned. Their players continued to chirp and chatter. One such monologue from Pietersen had perhaps crossed the line. It certainly caused Zaheer Khan to advance towards the slips cordon, threatening to introduce Pietersen’s face to the bat makers’ label. Perhaps Pietersen had asked about Zaheer Khan’s bat contract! As Andrew Miller says on Cricinfo, England need to talk less and bat more.

But then they did claw their way back into the game. Session-3 of day-3 also belonged to England, in my books. Although they did let Kumble get some runs and, in the process, develop a 50-run partnership with Laxman, they did polish off the India tail. They then batted sensibly and positively for the remaining 16 overs to end the day at 43 for no loss. England was helped by some poor bowling by Sreesanth. He seemed to be all over the place. He seemed to have lost his balance, his rhythm and his composure. He seemed horribly undercooked. Nasser Hussain, in his TV commentary, commented that Sreesanth did not bowl a single ball of pace in the morning nets! He bowled leg-spin instead! While Sreesanth appeared to be falling apart, Hussain commented, “I have no sympathy for the lad really.” Sreesanth’s final over of the day lasted nearly 7 minutes as he stuttered and spluttered his way to completion in an embarassing manner. It didn’t help either that Zaheer Khan and R. P. Singh seemed to be intent on bouncing out Strauss and Cook. But Sreesanth was the major disappointment for me. He would, I think, need an extended session in the nets with Venkatesh Prasad. If he doesn’t get his act together — and quickly — we could well see Romesh Powar as an extra spinner in the team for the 3rd and final The Oval Test match.

The match is delicately poised. My session-by-session score card reads, India 5, England 2. India is clearly in front. And they will be looking to Anil Kumble and Zaheer Khan to deliver them the goods. They’d need a solid bowling performance on a somewhat unhelpful pitch. The first session of day-4 could again hold the key. India should, I believe, adopt a batten-down-the-hatches-at-one-end policy while they attack from the other.

England have another 240 to get India to bat again. If the England openers build a good foundation, like the Indian openers did, then a Pietersen cameo can help wipe off the lead. From there on, it could be anyones’ match, in my view. England have their work cut out. But India have not done enough to ensure they do not bat again. As I said earlier, I don’t think the chapter on this Test match can be written, completed and set off to the sub-editors’ desk. The pitch is still playing reasonably well. Day-3 may have been the best day for batting, but I did not see any signs that would indicate that the pitch would deteriorate dramatically on day-4. The odd ball is keeping low, which would lead me to conclude that day-5 could be extremely tricky on this pitch. Which is why I don’t agree with Jonathan Agnew. Another 60-70 runs would have meant that India cannot lose this match. Although India is clearly in the drivers’ seat, if England have an exceptional day-4, it could lead to an extremely interesting day-5 of this game. The weather forecast is for two good days.

All I can say is “bring it on”.

— Mohan

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8 responses to “England Vs India: Test 2 Day 3 — England claw back…

  1. SreeSanth’s attitude can make a difference for India winning or draw. It is difficult to win with only 3 bowlers.

    Llyod’s in his commentary mentioned that Sachin had an ice cream when came to the dressing room and Ganguly was throwing tantrums 🙂 while walking back.

    Just for argument, is the same England bowling attack as Hoggard, Harmisson and Flintoff ?

  2. I do not understand your question gnbmdr. Could you repeat it a bit more clearly please?

    BTW, Lloyd has brown hair while Nasser Hussain has none!

  3. David Llyod, former coach of England, mentioned that 2 umpiring decisions by Taufel were very bad.
    But, Lloyd added that Sachin was cool about it, and Sachin walked back to the dressing room and had an ice cream, while Ganguly was throwing tantrums about the umpiring decision.

  4. As I said, David Lloyd has brown hair while Nasser Hussain has none! In other words, we can’t expect everyone in the world to be alike. If David Lloyd has a look at the five fingers in his hand, he may be shocked to realise that they are all different! I heard that part of David Lloyds’ commentary and thought “What an unfortunate pillock”!

    But I did not understand your earlier question. Could you repeat it a bit more clearly please?

  5. I watched the entire day’s play yesterday and what struck me most was England’s body language. Their shoulders never drooped, there was no sign of frustration or impatience and the bowlers did a fine job. Well done Vaughan for marshalling his troops admirably.

    Sidebottom, Tremlett and Monty all bowled consistently over after over. They stuck to a plan and I for one never felt that India were dominating them. When Sidebottom and Tremlett bowled, it always felt that a wicket was imminent.

    By contrast, when India bowled I got the feeling that there was no game plan (at least if there was one, the bowlers and in particular Sreesanth didn’t stick to it). Sreesanth seemed intent on hollow verbals with the batsmen who new better to ignore him. He better clean up his act and deliver tomorrow.

    It is no secret that Sreesanth and Kumble have better success against right-handers. I think Dravid will start of with RP and Zaheer hoping to get that initial breakthrough to expose the right-handers.

    It is going to be a long hard day and I expect England will back themselves to wipe off the deficit and go beyond. India on the other hand should emulate England’s game plan on what is likely to be a tough day for the bowling side. This is going to be a stern test for Dravid’s captaincy. All in all, a very interesting fourth day is afoot.

  6. Mohan, India could have got those 50-60 runs had umpires not sawn its two settled batsmen off and had Laxman not played like a tailender after reaching 50, blocking 24 deliveries without a run before getting out!

  7. Chandan,

    Agreed. And that is the reason Idon’t completely agree with Aggers’ comments. However, as you said, even though the decision went the way it did, Laxman and Dhoni could have played sensibly to get those additional 50-60 runs. Oh well…

  8. Pingback: Test 2 Day 4 - What’s in store for India? « i3j3Cricket :: A blog for fans of Indian cricket…

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