Team India are poor travelers?


In the last few days, two very interesting victories have made cricket interesting once again. India won at Kingsmead, Durban and England clinched The Ashes with a famous victory at the MCG.

For sometime now, I have been maintaining a list of some of the most thrilling Indian Test Cricket victories in recent times. I have added to this list, India’s victory on 29 December 2010 at Kingsmead, Durban, South Africa. The addition of “Durban 2010 v South Africa” to this impressive list is because it was once again a come-from-behind victory after a terrible loss in the 1st Test of the series (at Super Sport Park). The Durban victory is an important victory for Team India because it goes a long way towards debunking a myth — yet again! — that India plays badly overseas.

Is it important for India to debunk myths about her ability to play overseas?

No. Not really.

I think it is enough if India plays well every time she takes the field — regardless of where it is. And that is exactly what Team India has been doing in the last decade.

There are trash-talkers who wish to talk with their mouths and then play, sometimes simultaneously and almost always, to their own detriment — as Graeme Smith found out quite rudely in the Durban Test match! Greame Smith can believe the myths he creates to make himself happy about his lot in life. These myths have a strange way of enveloping the myth-creators. When that happens, the inevitable outcome is a simple pin-prick that results in a painful deflation of the balloon of arrogance. The myth-creators are often blind-sided by the myths that they create!

In the last decade, India has won 22 and lost 20 of her 61 overseas Tests for a win/loss ratio of 1.1 and a draw/loss ratio of 0.95. In the same period, when compared with the performance of South Africa, Australia, England and Sri Lanka, the corresponding figures for Australia (for Wins, Losses, Total Overseas Tests, W/L and D/L) are clearly the best at 34, 16, 59, 2.12, 0.56. The figures for South Africa are: 21, 18, 56, 1.16, 0.95. The figures for England are 19, 23, 62, 0.82, 0.86 and those for Sri Lanka are 11, 19, 39, 0.57, 0.47.

Clearly, Australia has the best win-loss ratio, thanks to Australia’s stunning performances when Steve Waugh (and then Ricky Ponting) captained an excellent team with Hayden, Langer, Ponting, Waugh, Martyn, Waugh, Gilchrist, Warne, McGrath, Gillespie et al. India’s win-loss ratio in the same period compares favorably with that of South Africa and puts into shade, the win-loss performances of Sri Lanka and England.

The draw/loss ratio is not a metric that is often used in comparative analyses of this sort. It is, in my view, as important as the more obvious win-loss ratio that is used almost always. It is a pointer to a teams’ grit and resolve — especially when it plays in unfamiliar conditions. A draw might not be a pretty sight. But it is a pointer to a teams’ grit in tough situations. The above figures might show Australia in poor light as a team that has an inability to grit it out. But this might be more due to the rather refreshing “win at all costs” attitude Australia used to employ in the early part of this decade. But India has drawn almost as many Tests as she has lost in overseas Tests!

Team India has an impressive draw-loss ratio and an acceptable win-loss ratio that is constantly improving.

For example, if we take just the last 5 years, the win-loss and draw-loss ratios are 1.44 and 1.33 for India, 1.66 and 0.89 for Australia, 1.62 and 0.875 for South Africa, 0.6 and 0.86 for England, and, 0.7 and 0.6 for Sri Lanka.

Overall, apart from the impressive Australia team — and that too, in the first half of this decade gone by — India stacks up really well with other top teams in terms of her “overseas” performances. So, in my view, it is time we start debunking these myths about Team India being poor travelers.

To me, with the addition of the latest victory at Kingsmead, this big-list list of recent Indian Test victories reads: Kolkata 2001 (v Australia), Leeds 2002 (v England), Adelaide 2003 (v Australia), Multan 2004 (v Pakistan), Sabina Park 2006 (v West Indies), Johannesburg 2006 (v South Africa), Perth 2008 (v Australia), Mohali 2008 (v Australia), Chennai 2008 (v England), Colombo, P. Sara 2010 (v Sri Lanka), Kingsmead Durban 2010 (v South Africa).

It is fair to say that, with a few days to go to the end of the current decade, the period from 2001 to 2010 has represented an exciting decade for Indian cricket. We have seen some exciting talent explode onto the scene — MS Dhoni, Yuvraj Singh, Harbhajan Singh, Zaheer Khan, Virender Sehwag and Gautam Gambhir, to name a few. We are seeing a few young turks itching to have a crack on the big stage — Suresh Raina, Virat Kohli, Cheteshwar Pujara, M. Vijay, Pragyan Ojha and Ishant Sharma, to name a few. And this entire march has been presided over by the “Famous Five” or the “Fab Five”; five of the best gentlemen to grace Indian cricket together in the same team.

One of this quintet — The Famous Five — was responsible for this sensational victory in Durban. The smiling assassin, V. V. S. Laxman, carefully scripted this impressive victory. And with this victory, the world might start accepting that a green-top is as useful to India as it is to the host.

As Dileep Premachandran says, “If one picture could tell you the story of how Indian cricket’s fortunes have changed in three years, it would be that taken at Kingsmead at 9.58am on Wednesday. Shanthakumaran Sreesanth, who had tested his captain’s patience in the last game by taking an age to bowl his overs, pitched one just short of a length to Jacques Kallis. The ball spat up like an angry cobra and it said much about Kallis’s skill that he jackknifed and managed to get a glove to it before it rearranged his features. The ball lobbed up gently to Virender Sehwag at gully and four wickets down with another 180 to get, South Africa were out for the count. And, after years of their batsmen copping punishment from opposition quicks, an Indian pace bowler was dishing it out.”

That ball will become part of Indian cricket folklore. As Ayaz Memon said on his Twitter time-line (@cricketwallah), “Sreesanth’s snorter to dismiss Kallis will become as famous in cricket lore as Sandhu’s banana delivery that got Greenidge in 1983 World Cup.”

In conclusion, let us debunk two myths: One, that India are poor travelers. Two, that a lively pitch only assists the home team when Team India visits!

Ps:

While we are on the topic of green-tops, how is it ok for Graeme Smith or Dale Steyn to “request” for green-tops against India while a “request” for a spin-friendly wicket in India by an Indian captain or player is frowned upon when Australia or South Africa visit Indian shores?

I have never heard a visiting Indian captain whine about the state of pitches in Melbourne, Leeds or Durban? Isn’t it time that captains that visit the sub-continent lock their whine-vocal-chords at home before they board the plane?

PPs:

While I exist in this paranoid state, am I the only one to believe that if Ricky’s surname was not Ponting, but either Singh or Kumar or Khan, he would have been suspended for his totally over-the-top antics at the MCG? Had I been the umpire and had an on-field captain carried on like a pork chop the way Ricky Ponting did, I would have searched for a red card and thrown the man out of the park! The fact that Aleem Dar tolerated the Ponting “carry on” was a testament to the umpires’ patience. The fact that the match referee slapped a mere fine on Ponting means that, to me, the Match Referee’s office is, once again, shown up for the disgrace it is. The fact that Cricket Australia did not suspend Ricky Ponting immediately means that the “Spirt of Cricket” document that all Australian cricketers sign up when they get the Baggy Green needs to be torn up immediately and re-written in an environment of grace and humility.

— Mohan

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9 responses to “Team India are poor travelers?

  1. Srikanth Mangalam

    http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/news-by-industry/et-cetera/umpire-davis-was-drunk-on-eve-of-durban-test-sa-players/articleshow/7191594.cms

    Talk of being sore losers.

    What would one have to say about Kallis banging into a gate driving late at night after the first test. Reminds me of a similar incident involving a golfer!!!

  2. Your comment at the end of your article on Ricky Ponting’s behavior is spot on the money. As Ian Chappell says, the ICC needs a thorough structural overhaul and the first thing to go should be the match referee’s post. If the umpire had cards, Ricky Ponting would have been red carded out of the rest of the game.

  3. If we compare the win-loss and draw-loss ratios for Australia, India and SA (in overseas Tests) over the last 10 years and over the last 5 years they are:

    Australia: 2.12, 0.56 (10-yr) and 1.66 and 0.89 (5-yr)
    India: 1.1, 0.95 (10-yr) and 1.44 and 1.33 (5-yr)
    South Africa: 1.16, 0.95 (10-yr) and 1.62 and 0.875 (5-yr)
    England: 0.82, 0.86 (10-yr) and 0.6 and 0.86 (5-yr)
    Sri Lanka: 0.57, 0.47 (10-yr) and 0.7 and 0.6 (5-yr)

    India has had a significant improvement in its overseas win-loss and draw-loss ratios over the last 5 years. Australia has won less and drawn more. South Africa has won more but drawn fewer games overseas. Clearly, India is the team on the up — especially in terms of its “overseas” performances.

    — Mohan

  4. Sundar Ramakrishnan

    But it is going to take some time for the image makeover. Wouldn’t mind some consistency too. That may be needed before “experts” like Darren Gough are silenced (http://www.rediff.com/cricket/report/india-sa-tour-2010-england-can-beat-india-every-day-gough/20101230.htm, in case you haven’t seen it).

  5. In the last 24 hours or so, I read reports that Steve Davies was drunk on the eve of the Durban Test Match. Apparently that that may have affected Davies’s decision-making abilities! Most of Davies’s bad decisions were on day-4 of the Test Match! The man has such a long hangover? If Davies was drunk on the eve of the Test Match, the team that would have copped it most would have been India who batted first!

  6. Yes, the Australian team is struggling…..but are they any worse than the Indian teams of the Graham Yallop era ?

    Bring Back Warnie, Merv and Boonie !!

  7. Pingback: UnDReSsing and UnDeRStanding the UDRS | i3j3Cricket :: A blog for fans of Indian cricket…

  8. Can the Indian test team beat Australia in its current form ??

  9. Can’t agree with you more, Mohan! Awesomely put up… quite eager to see how ACB takes up Aussie cricket from here.. easy to say “sack ponting/clarke” they would be still unsure about replacements. Easily could be the biggest setback since Border’s renaissance in the 80s. guess like how the “bombay” bias got in the way during Indian team selection (esplly in the 80s and 90s), ACB has always been partial with NSW team. This setback hopefully could help them reorganize. All said and done, its not easy to take them lightly esplly in the ODIs.

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